Fitzpatrix

My Bizarre Adventures

Tag Archives: Entertainment

They Don’t Call It Tragic-Con

The four days of the San Diego Comic-Con are almost upon us, so with that in mind, let’s take a look back at Comic Book: The Movie, a 2004 mockumetary filmed on location at the 2002 Comic-Con. Starring and directed by Mark Hamill (you know, that clown from that space movie), the comedy features interviews with geek culture bigwigs such as Stan Lee, Bruce Campbell and Kevin Smith, as well as the talents of several prolific voice actors including Billy West, Jess Harnell and Tom Kenny. Although it’s a little choppy, I recommend it just for the novelty of seeing top-notch voice actors plying their craft in a live-action production.

Here’s my favorite deleted scene with Harnell and West performing a lovely song called “Four Color World” to a group of Comic-Con attendees.

Credit: thedvdupdate

Modal Node to Joy

In May of 1977, an innovative motion picture was released that forever altered the way we understand and create films. It depicted a fast-paced, fantastical adventure that has fueled many imaginations and taught many important life lessons. Of course, I refer to the Hal Needham opus, Smokey and the Bandit! Just kidding, you know what I’m talking about.

There’s no denying the immediate impact that Star Wars has made on the pop cultural landscape, especially in the franchise’s early years. A wide variety of products were made to capitalize on the film’s widespread popularity, ranging from exciting new stories based on the universe, like the early Marvel comics and Brian Daley’s Han Solo Adventures (which I highly recommend), to other movies and shows that took their cues from George Lucas’s modern-day space serial. Even John Williams’s iconic orchestral score became in vogue, with Meco’s various disco remixes of the leitmotifs from the films being the most famous example.

One of the more obscure tributes to Williams’s work on the films is double bassist Ron Carter‘s 1980 album, Empire Jazz, an easy listening homage to the then-recent music of The Empire Strikes Back, including the themes for Darth Vader, Yoda, and the Leia/Han romance motif. Here is my personal favorite track on the album, the underrated theme of Cloud City kingpin and Rebel general, Lando Calrissian.

Thanks to Andy Lindemann for finding this album.

Cream of the Crop

Yesterday was the birthday of the late Master of Macho Madness, Randy Savage! Let’s belatedly celebrate the occasion with this intense music video featuring the former WWF World Heavyweight and Intercontinental Champion raising varying degrees of Hell during his Memphis wrestling days set to “Rock Warriors” by the Rods.

Hail to the King, Baby!

Today marks the birthday of one of my all-time favorite filmmakers, Sam Raimi, whose playfully dynamic style shines through no matter what project he works on. Let’s take a look back at his humble origins with Raimi’s trippy 1978 short film Clockwork.

El Santo Sea Alabado

In honor of the 99th birthday of one of the most important luchadors in Lucha Libre history, El Santo, check out this 5 part animated miniseries created by award-winning writer and producer Carlo Olivares Paganoni featuring the Silver-Masked One battling a band of evil clones!

Steam Factor One

50 years ago, a strange, unique science fiction adventure show kicked off its 3 season run on NBC with the tale of a simple country doctor falling in love with a shape-shifting salt vampire. Ever since these humble origins, the Star Trek franchise has been going strong, with various additions and re-imaginings of the mythos created by both fans and professionals alike. One of the most popular Star Trek fan films is a loving, well-crafted tribute to both Trek and silent films by the name of Steam Trek: The Moving Picture. Directed and co-written by British animator Dennis Sisterson, this hilarious 1994 film details a typical mission aboard the USS Isambard gone awry, thanks to the interference of derby-donning Klingons. With a suitably whimsical score, faithful imagery and inspired characterizations (especially the Harold Lloyd-esque Spock), this short remains one of the top examples of a standout fan production!

Hope you enjoy it and…well, you know.

Under the water where the seaweed grows…

With the Rio Summer Olympics in full swing, I suggest checking out the 1980 animated cult classic Animalympics! Helmed by Steven Lisburger, director of Tron, this film features the vocal talents of Gilda Radner, Harry Shearer and Billy Crystal, as well as the animation work of Roger Allers, Bill Kroyer, and Brad Bird. What was initially conceived as one of two NBC animated specials that would commemorate the 1980 Summer and Winter Olympics was then released as a feature film as a result of the Moscow Olympics boycott. Still, this is a fun but very bizarre picture that almost feels like a psychedelic approach to the traditional squash-and-stretch, Termite Terrace style. One element of the movie that will always hold up is its exceptional soundtrack by Graham Gouldman of 10cc, best exemplified by my favorite song in the movie, “Underwater Fantasy.”

Quite Hypnotic…

Captain’s log, stardate 47457.1. Today’s date matches up with the Earth date of June 16th, which is Captain Picard Day! Here are a few ways you can celebrate one of the finest Captains in Starfleet:

  • Watch “Best of Both Worlds”, “Tapestry”, “The Inner Light” and any other Picard-heavy episode.
  • Drink a cup of hot Earl Grey tea.
  • Re-enact this scene: 
  • Ponder why this Frenchman has an English accent.
  • Jam to this: 

 

Rocks on the Eternal Shore

I just saw X-Men: Apocalypse, which was pretty good. Oscar Isaac’s take on the titular villain, created in 1986 by writer Louise Simonson and artist Jackson Guice, had the right amount of godlike solemnity and bellicose bravado that the role needed. If you ask me, no portrayal of Apocalypse can come close to the performance of John Colicos in the 90’s X-Men animated series. Here’s a montage of some of Apocalypse’s greatest quotes from the show compiled by thejokersonyou!

Hope you enjoy it!

The Wildest is Yet to Come!

Holy first appearances! Today marks the 77th anniversary of the publication date of Detective Comics #27, where a certain cowled, Chiroptera-themed gumshoe made his debut in a grim, six-page story called “The Case of the Chemical Syndicate“. Let’s celebrate this day by focusing on the two stars of the much more lighthearted 1966 Batman TV show that, at the time, sparked a wave of enthusiasm about the character. So sit back in your Bat-recliner and listen to a couple of songs that Adam West and Burt Ward performed in the midst of Batmania.

First is West’s “Miranda”, a strangely moody pop tune about a Batman-esque hero attempting to balance his crime fighting career with his relationship with the titular damsel.

Finally, check out this schmaltzy yet charming musical team-up of Ward and the experimental music maven Frank Zappa in “Boy Wonder, I Love You”. Never before has a recitation of fan mail sounded so pleasant!

Hope you enjoy these and don’t forget to share your favorite Batman stories and moments in the comments section!